u kno i had to do it to em

celeste || 24 || english & 中文 || art blog where i post my oc art and sometimes complain

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zylphide
babushka(he/she, он/она/)
Time ago
babushka

i am SCARED for my succulents okay. they say you have to keep them out of the direct sunlight for a week after repotting and not water them after that one watering you did while repotting and I'm terrified. you know what happened to the succulent leaves that were supposed to give roots after being left to dry for a week? they DRIED, @star-rice. they're DEAD. they won't produce life anymore. also every tutorial just says "put them at a south facing window" AS IF I HAVE FOUR WINDOWS IN MY HOUSE EACH ONE FACING EACH DIRECTION. both of my windows are facing...whatever they're facing, north-west? too poor too mentally ill for plants, I guess. but they're so pretty it hurts

babushka

@star-rice i am assuming the middle ones are dead. i splashed them with water because nothing works anyway


zylphide

those directions are uh very oddly specific and i don't think they're that good tbh

"south-facing window" sounds very specific, but obviously not everyone has a south-facing window. that usually means the window with the most light (south-facing windows tend to get the most amount of sunlight light for people living in the northern hemisphere). if a north-facing one is all you have, that's fine too.

the succulent leaves you're showing there look like aeonium kiwi (i think, based off the general shape and the red tinges around the leaves). they can hold some water in their leaves, but they're not like traditional desert succulents because they're from a more subtropical climate. their soil needs to be a bit moist instead of completely dry.

as for propagating leaves of succulents, it's a mixed bag depending on the species. the leaves you're showing off here are 90% goners (especially the yellow ones). i've actually never had any success propagating the leaves of aeoniums. i don't think it's possible for the leaves to grow roots for this particular genus - it usually has to have a bit of stem for it to grow roots.

plants can be wack and kind of picky, and it's really hard to get "good" care instructions unless you know the specific genus (not easy for people who aren't familiar with plants who get unlabelled plants at the store), and even then they can just Perish out of nowhere. please don't blame yourself! even i've had plenty of plants die on me after i did my best to take care of them and i would consider myself "good" at taking care of plants.

EDIT: actually they might be echeveria agavoides, not aeonium kiwi (aeoniums have serrated leaves and i don't think your succulents have those). for echeverias, i just take the entire leaf and shove it in some dry soil and water it every once in a while. i don't bother leaving it to dry for a week or whatever. sometimes the leaves grow roots after a while, but they also might just die. it's like a 80% death rate for me when it comes to leaves. i've had better chances (almost 100% survival rate) if propagating them by cutting off one of the heads instead.



zylphide
babushka(he/she, он/она/)
Time ago

OK Very Important Announcement

babushka

I am now a proud owner of

this.

The question is. How do I care for them? Especially in this cold winter. This thing doesn't have any holes on the bottom, so I'm concerned about that too. I recall people on waterfall being mostly good with plants so I'm asking YOU.

babushka

night reblog


zylphide

it's plant science time!!

the fact that there's no holes on the bottom is concerning - succulents do not like having waterlogged roots because they grow in desert, so they are very prone to having root rot. you may wish to put them in a different container with drainage holes (or somehow make a hole in it but idk if that's feasible lmao). if you repot them, make sure the soil you're using has rocks (like perlite) mixed in to improve drainage. also if that's Real Moss in there, take it out as it'll retain water

assuming you have them in a pot/tin can/literally whatever with a hole for drainage, i would recommend watering them once a week at the very maximum. terracotta pots dry out much faster than non-porous pots like plastic or metal, so you can water succulents in those a bit more often. just make sure that the soil in the pot is completely dry, or you risk getting root rot. since you live in a colder climate, you may not need to water them often (like... once a month maybe?). succulents are good at surviving dry conditions, not so much wet ones.

speaking of water, this is gonna sound counterintuitive, but whenever you water, you need to make sure the soil is completely wet. this mimics a desert environment, where there are long stretches of no rain, followed by heavy rains that soak the soil, and then back to no rain. watering them a little each time every day or so keeps the roots wet constantly, which again, risks root rot.

since succulents are from the desert, they like lots and lots of sun. keep them in a north or south-facing window where they can get a lot of light. they won't die without a lot of light, but they'll etiolate (stretch), and become very leggy, like this:

they are not very happy in this state, even if it looks like they're growing a lot. but sometimes it's unavoidable. like i have my plants under a grow light for 12 hours a day and some of the lil fuckers still do this so kdjafksdjf

most succulents can tolerate temps down to ~50F/10C, then they either die or go dormant. below freezing temps will kill them very fast. if you can keep em away from drafty areas, they should be fine.

uhhh i can't think of anything else right now, so let me know if you have any more questions



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